Monthly Archives: October 2014

PORTABLELINUXAPPS.ORG: PORTABLE APPLICATION SET FOR LINUX


After a review about PortableApps.com for Windows, here I come again with a review about portable application set, now for Linux.

The name is so similar to the one I reviewed before: PortableLinuxApps.org. But, unlike the PortableApps.com, PortableLinuxApps.org doesn’t give us a managed launcher that looks like a start menu. The applications provided by PortableLinuxApps.org are stand-alone and come in <.bin> file format. They can be executed directly from the directory where they are saved.

How to run portable applications in Linux

  • Visit PortableLinuxApps.org to download your favorite application(s) and save to your preferred directory or USB flash-disk. Choose the 32-bit or 64-bit version as you need.
  • After you download the application(s), in your terminal, cd to the directory of your downloaded application(s). Use “root mode” (sudo su, su, etc.) if necessary. By the way, I’m running PCLinuxOS where I can access the integrated terminal directly right from my Dolphin (file manager). If you are running a different distribution, it’s better for you to find out the information, whether your file manager support an integrated terminal or not. Click the image below to enlarge.

PortableLinuxApps1

  • Ensure that the files you downloaded are in <.bin> file format and has no space in the name. If you find the file format is not <.bin>, rename the file name into: bin, name-of-application.bin, name_of_application.bin, etc.
  • Type command: chmod a+x name_of_apps.bin to change the access rights and type ./name_of_apps.bin to execute the application.
  • Such that simple.

How to create your own portable applications in Linux

Although PortableLinuxApps.org provides almost all portable Linux applications as a ready-to-use application, for some reasons, we might want to create our own applications collection. And for Linux users, luckily, it’s so easy and almost cost nothing (except the bill of internet connection, of course).

As a basic guide to create your own portable application, please watch the following video:

Notes:

  • To create a portable application, you will need AppDirAssistant and AppImageAssistant. So, if your Linux distribution doesn’t have them in its software center, you can download the portable version and run them manually from http://sourceforge.net/projects/portable/files/  (for 32-bit Linux) or http://sourceforge.net/projects/portable/files/64bit/ (for 64-bit Linux).
  • To create a portable application, it’s better for you to not start it from a very updated operating system since the application package (including the dependencies in it) may not compatible in other older distribution. If you have a very updated operating system, you may get the following warning (click the image below to enlarge):

PortableLinuxApps2

What are the good things

Portable applications are always a good thing since they make us able to do any work, anywhere and anytime—borderless. They are tiny applications that won’t spend our disk space. Their portability and their file format are supported (recognized) by all Linux distributions, so we will never be worried about unable to run an application in a various Linux distribution.

What are the bad things

Just the same as other Linux applications, to run or to install or to create a package of a particular application, sometimes we still rely on “typing a command” feature. For a Linux newbie, it might be pretty hard to understand and remember the commands sequence. But for me, nothing too hard if we want to keep learning :).

But, the problem above is a “tradition” on Linux. The only part of PortableLinuxApps.org I quite “hate” is that there is no Help/Contact/Forum page on the web site. Whenever a newbie like me need help, nobody can help, except asking someone from other forums. That’s all.

Conclusions

Just the same as the package for the Windows version, PortableLinuxApps.org also comes to meet our daily mobile computing under major Linux operating system, so it’s crucial to have them in our removable media (USB flash-disk, portable hard-drive, etc.).

Advertisements